Month: March 2015

Egg-in-a-‘cado

I emerged from the garage, stumped. The nest wasn’t there this time. Perhaps over by the rusted-out car… nope. The lumber pile? Uh-uh. The hen was getting smarter. I saw Granny disappearing into the woods with her three big dogs, while I stayed behind to hunt for the fresh eggs. The blooming Dogwood distracted me, raining down delicate petals with the breeze, falling around me like fairy dust, gently covering the surface of the scarcely-used-anymore sandbox. Eureka! Nestled against the big rock behind the sandbox? The nest! With two big fat eggs nestled in the dried grass and old feathers. Hopefully they would have double yolks… This is the grown-up version of the classic egg-in-a-hole. Though at first consideration a humble food, the egg is yet ubiquitous among tasty treats. And it can even, I daresay, be elevated to a gourmet treasure. The warm earthiness of baked avocado and caraway does just this, and yet it remains such a simple recipe that it could easily become an everyday habit. The beauty of baking an egg …

Waffle Cake

Some things I love about Sweden: While other Nordic countries have respectable colors like white, crimson, and dark blue on their flags, Sweden’s is an almost aqua shade of blue and bright yellow. Sweden recycles 99% of household waste. Sweden comes in at number 4 on The Global Gender Gap Index (Iceland, Finland, and Norway are numbers 1, 2, and 3, respectively). You can buy caviar in tubes. There are entire days dedicated to baked goods, i.e., October 4th is Cinnamon Bun Day, Fat Tuesday is all about Semla Buns, Christmas is rung in with St. Lucia Saffron Buns, and March 25th is—you guessed it—Waffle Day! When I first saw a waffle cake in Sweet Paul Magazine, I knew I had to make one, and Waffle Day seemed like the perfect opportunity! The waffle irons that are most popular in Scandinavia create thin waffles with five or six heart shapes in them. This shape makes for a lovely cake, but of course any shape will do. If you use a Belgian waffle iron, however, you …

Roasted Kohlrabi Mascarpone Cannelloni

The sunlight floods in, combining with the heat of the stove to trick my mind and body into believing it’s summer. There’s no memory behind this recipe. It’s brand new. But it represents those moments of pure contentment, when I find myself busy at a fulfilling task, looking forward to success, hopeful that I’ll achieve something beautiful. I take another shell and fill it. Then another. I think of Italy, nostalgic for a heritage that isn’t mine. I pour a glass of wine, and reach for another shell. My aunt challenged me to come up with ideas for kohlrabi other than the standard stir fry. This is my second recipe; the first was my Twisted Apple Salad, where I used it raw, along with roasted beets and Granny Smith apples. That salad was the first time I had tasted raw kohlrabi, and this cannelloni is the first time I’ve tasted it cooked. It’s a brand new vegetable to me, and I’m so very glad I was introduced to it! It’s a fantastic little veggie: crisp, …

Spring Quiche

Everywhere I look people sit in the sun, bundled in jackets and scarves, feeling the warmth on their closed eyelids, basking in Spring’s first rays. I realize there’s a reason Springtime in Paris is a cliché. Tourists flood the city, searching for romance and adventures; locals respond more softly towards said tourists, with the knowledge that winter is behind them and in a few months they’ll be able to escape the city before the worst of the heat sets in. Flowers poke through the soil, and cherry blossoms blow in the wind like nature’s confetti. The last few days in Gothenburg have been like this, and much like in the picture above from Paris nine years ago, I’m donning my Spring jacket despite the cold wind. But in the refuge of my balcony, sheltered from the wind but open to the sun, it’s like summer for a few hours in the afternoon. I’ve planted flowers and herbs and prepared it for afternoon lounging. And even though I might have to bring everything in during freezing …

Swedish Meatball Sliders

What makes a meatball Swedish? The spices? Allspice? Nutmeg? Maybe even cardamom, cloves, or ginger? Is a smörgåsbord required? Is it the filler? Bread cubes or crumbs? Mashed potatoes, perhaps? Or grated onion? Should pork, beef, or veal be the bulk? Just pork and beef, or all three? Should they be fried or baked? After studying a myriad of recipes, my conclusion is that any combination of the above can result in a Swedish meatball! According to Sweden’s official website, the most important thing is that they “must be prepared, above all, with love.” As sentimental as this might be, I agree. But don’t forget the lingonberries! Potato Bread Buns Since Swedish meatballs are usually served with potatoes, I decided to put the potatoes in the buns. Lightly adapted from Betty Crocker. Ingredients 1 1/2 teaspoons dry yeast 175 ml (3/4 cup) warm water 1 tablespoon white sugar 1 dl (scant 1/2 cup) warm mashed potatoes 75 g (1/3 cup) butter, at room temperature 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 egg 510 g (3 1/2 cups) all-purpose …

Strawberries and Cream Biscuits on Hazelnut Meringues

Things that make me go hmmmm chocolate cake with chocolate chips and chocolate icing the perfect espresso writing a long overdue email and getting a response the next day writing a spontaneous email and getting no response at all does this go in the dryer? a sunset on Siesta beach a picnic on Siesta beach… …with my parents exactly what kind of cheese is this? red wine clean sheets a bubble bath why did I miss Mexican food when I lived in Paris? a poem about dreams coffee stains covering the backsplash… no clue how they got there dried pancake batter on the ceiling… no clue how it got there behind my stove coffee on the balcony in January strawberry shortcake in March Hazelnut Meringues Inspired by The Flavor Thesaurus. Ingredients 3 egg whites 175g (3/4 cup) white sugar 65g (1/2 cup) toasted chopped hazelnuts Directions If you’re toasting your own hazelnuts, chop them and spread them out on a baking sheet. Place under the broiler and monitor them for 5-10 minutes until they start …