All posts filed under: Munchies

Crunchy Nectarine Macadamia Granola Bars

The long-delayed part 2 of my road trip posts! These granola bars, studded with macadamias and golden raisins, filled out by puffed rice and oats, and with a scent of cardamom, are crunchy, satisfying, and the perfect thing to keep you going on a long road trip, cheer you on a rainy morning, or sustain you long enough to see the Norwegian midnight sun on a chilly night. Check out Instagram for a few more pictures of the road trip! Makes sixteen 2.5×12.5 cm (1×5 in) bars. Ingredients 60 ml (1/4 cup) honey 120ml (1/2 cup) nectarine purée 1/2 teaspoon cardamom 125g (1 1/2 cups) oats 200g (1 1/2 cups) macadamia nuts, chopped 40g (1/2 cup) shredded coconut 40g (1 1/3 cups) puffed rice cereal 100g (3/4 cup) golden raisins Directions Preheat the oven to 180C/350F, and spread the oats, macadamia nuts, and coconut onto a baking sheet; toast them for 10-15 minutes, until lightly golden. Remove to cool and reduce the oven temperature to 150C/300F. Heat the honey in the microwave for 20 seconds, …

Mom’s Maple Pecan Cookies

“I want chocolate cake! With chocolate chips in it!” My young heart raced with the thought. “And chocolate icing…with chocolate shavings!” What else, I desperately thought, eager to not lose my chance of having the best cake ever. “And chocolate ice cream to go with it!” I concluded, triumphantly. I got my wish, believe it or not; my birthday cake that year was in the shape of a teddy bear head, with cupcakes for ears. It was chocolate, chocolate, chocolate, chocolate, with chocolate on the side. My mom always knew how to pull out all the stops for special occasions. Or even everyday occasions. Biscuits, cornbread, and sheet cakes, which she began making as a young, Southern girl; trifle, Nanaimo bars, and butter tarts, adopted from her time in Canada; venison roasts following us to every place we moved, hunted and frozen from Thanksgivings in Tennessee spent at the family farm. Jam-filled muffins, saucy baked meatballs, and steaming hot monkey bread all made frequent appearances, much to our pleasure. I suppose, if I had to …

Swedish Meatball Sliders

What makes a meatball Swedish? The spices? Allspice? Nutmeg? Maybe even cardamom, cloves, or ginger? Is a smörgåsbord required? Is it the filler? Bread cubes or crumbs? Mashed potatoes, perhaps? Or grated onion? Should pork, beef, or veal be the bulk? Just pork and beef, or all three? Should they be fried or baked? After studying a myriad of recipes, my conclusion is that any combination of the above can result in a Swedish meatball! According to Sweden’s official website, the most important thing is that they “must be prepared, above all, with love.” As sentimental as this might be, I agree. But don’t forget the lingonberries! Potato Bread Buns Since Swedish meatballs are usually served with potatoes, I decided to put the potatoes in the buns. Lightly adapted from Betty Crocker. Ingredients 1 1/2 teaspoons dry yeast 175 ml (3/4 cup) warm water 1 tablespoon white sugar 1 dl (scant 1/2 cup) warm mashed potatoes 75 g (1/3 cup) butter, at room temperature 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 egg 510 g (3 1/2 cups) all-purpose …

Cocoa Rosemary Hazelnut Icebox Pinwheels

Settling myself on the grass, I began laying out my picnic. A man, at least in his fifties, caught my attention. In the process of limbering up for what I assumed would be yoga or tai chi, he commenced undressing, stripping down to tight boxer briefs. This being Paris, I wasn’t too taken aback, and I turned my attention to my food. This was not to be, however, because the man’s stretching was exaggerated to the point of absurdity, and I could not help but think that this was part of some elaborate ruse. I began stealing glances around me to see if anyone else was noticing these surreal happenings. Mesmerized by how even a Frenchman could act like he was completely alone in a public park (and even then, I surmise most people don’t act that ludicrous even when they are alone), I had no idea that it would get oh-so-much better. I was beyond surprised when he began rolling head over heels down the hill, somersault after somersault. Reaching the bottom, he bounced …

The Rugelach That Won Over France & Provençal Butternut Squash Rugelach

This week, the group Tuesdays with Dorie is baking The Rugelach That Won Over France from Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. A light, flaky pastry contains a nutty chocolate coconut cherry filling and is baked in little upended pinwheels. I slightly modified the filling for my tastes: raspberry flavored dark chocolate and no cinnamon or cherries. Wow! It was good. It was my first time making rugelach, and I was quite pleased. So pleased that I decided to make my own savory version with a more traditional crescent shape. I also altered the dough a bit for a richer taste and more dense texture. I added crème fraîche and an egg yolk, and adjusted the flour accordingly. Filled with roasted and mashed butternut squash and shallots, flavored with Herbes de Provence, and sprinkled with flakes of sea salt, this savory variant provides a nice warming snack on a cold winter afternoon. Ingredients Directions Put the flour in a mixing bowl and add the butter and cream cheese in small chunks. Pinch the butter and …

Anytime Chocolate Muffins

In my Granny’s Southern household, huge chocolate sheet cakes were a staple. And the coveted corner pieces, with three sides covered in frosting, were the first to go. Unless you were quick, usually it was Granny herself who pilfered each corner piece, eschewing cake-cutting decorum and leaving the impression to anyone arriving unexpectedly that gremlins had been sneaking bites in the kitchen. Living in a household of two, where the other only eats tiny bits of chocolate from time to time, if I made a large sheet cake it would fall to me to eat the whole thing. And I probably would. So I came up with a healthier, longer-lasting, single-serving option for when I need to top up my chocolate reserves without adding the extra calories and sugar overload. It’s not the same, but I think gremlins would still come after it when I’m not looking. These little gems are gluten, grain, and sugar free, provide antioxidants from the raw cacao, sustenance from the eggs and almonds, and have minimal blood sugar impact. Perfect …

Norwegian Cardamom Buns

The scene outside the passenger window takes my breath away. The fjord sparkles under the midnight sun, and mountains rise up in rocky walls, with glacier melt cascading down in shiny rivulets. I lean in to the curve as the car sweeps around yet another peninsula, heading back towards the mainland. A cluster of houses populate the shore here, and I wonder what it’s like to live here, to have to plan for groceries. Yes, this is what comes to mind: if I lived here I would need a huge trailer to haul groceries once a month! Would the magical location make it worth it? Perhaps. Time for a snack. Sometimes the simplest things in life are some of the best. Road trips are one of our favorite pastimes when we visit Norway. There’s this cardamom raisin bun that you can find in grocery stores and gas stations; it’s pretty common. And in most places, it’s just a regular bun, but for some reason, the ones from the gas station are so delicious. Ingredients Directions …