All posts filed under: On The Side

For-the-Road Lentil Salad

The days melded into a long haze, sweltering, the buzzing of flies and bees piercing the thick stillness; the cool nights provided brief respite. The road beckoned. It was time to blow this joint, take to the road, journey to cooler climes. As I planned for our road trip from Göteborg, Sweden to Tromsø, Norway, I wanted some food that was easy to pack and carry, but still delicious. Healthy couldn’t hurt either. Granola bars were obvious, but I also wanted meals. So I thought wraps, perhaps, and jar salads! So, here is my first road trip post: a refreshing and hearty salad in a jar that will stay crisp until you combine it. The following is enough for two generous servings. For this post, I made them in small jars, which were tipped out into bowls and stirred. For our road trip, I made it in a big jar with room for shaking, which you can see on my instagram feed! Ingredients 1 dl (scant 1/2 cup) beluga lentils juice of half a lime …

Friton-Topped Risotto-Stuffed Peppers

This will be my last duck post for a while. With the remaining meat tucked away safely in the freezer, I think it’s time for some sweet things next week! Makes enough for for 2 lunch servings, or 2-4 side servings, depending on what the rest of dinner is! They are also great leftover right out of the fridge. Ingredients 2 medium yellow or orange bell peppers 1 teaspoon duck fat (or olive oil) 1 shallot, minced 120 ml (1/2 cup) uncooked Carnaroli rice (or Arborio) 3 dl (1 1/4 cup) rich duck stock (or chicken or vegetable stock) about 10 chopped prunes 1 dl (scant 1/2 cup) pine nuts 60ml (1/4 cup) whole milk 50g (1/2 cup) grated parmesan 2-3 sprigs fresh parsley, snipped sea salt and freshly ground pepper handful fritons (duck cracklings) Directions Heat oil over medium heat, then add the minced shallot. Sauté for about 3 minutes, then add the rice and stir for an additional 1 minute. Add the stock and bring to a boiling point. Give it a quick …

Duck, Duck, Salad

I never liked playing Duck, Duck, Goose. It’s an interminable game that’s excruciatingly boring for unpopular kids and overly exhausting for those who are continually picked. And no matter who you are, you still have to sit there and be repeatedly patted on the head by probably unwashed hands. As if that wasn’t enough, it’s completely nonsensical, because by far the funnest part is when you become the picker, but you only become so when you “lose” the chase! So is there ever really a winner? Now, these two duck salads are a different story. Together, they have something for everyone. One uses breast meat, the other dark meat. One is fresh and tangy, with dried cranberries and sharp cheese, the other is sweet and creamy, with cherries and hints of licorice from fennel. Whichever you choose (I hope you choose both) you won’t be disappointed. So, without further ado, I present part three of my duck series. If you’re interested in other duck recipes, check out some previous posts: Duck Ramen + Whole Roasted …

Roasted Kohlrabi Mascarpone Cannelloni

The sunlight floods in, combining with the heat of the stove to trick my mind and body into believing it’s summer. There’s no memory behind this recipe. It’s brand new. But it represents those moments of pure contentment, when I find myself busy at a fulfilling task, looking forward to success, hopeful that I’ll achieve something beautiful. I take another shell and fill it. Then another. I think of Italy, nostalgic for a heritage that isn’t mine. I pour a glass of wine, and reach for another shell. My aunt challenged me to come up with ideas for kohlrabi other than the standard stir fry. This is my second recipe; the first was my Twisted Apple Salad, where I used it raw, along with roasted beets and Granny Smith apples. That salad was the first time I had tasted raw kohlrabi, and this cannelloni is the first time I’ve tasted it cooked. It’s a brand new vegetable to me, and I’m so very glad I was introduced to it! It’s a fantastic little veggie: crisp, …

Twisted Apple Salad

“There was no way this was going to work,” I thought, as I pressed my thumbnail into the apple, “I don’t care what she said!” I continued scoring the apple around the middle, however, persevering despite my lack of belief; after all, what better time than recess for carrying out ridiculous experiments? When I was satisfied that the score around the middle of the fat apple was good enough—and I couldn’t be criticized for half-hearted effort—I gripped the top in one hand, the bottom in the other, and gave it a mighty twist. Crack! I looked down at my hands, each palming a separate half! After a moment of astonishment, there was nothing left to do, really, except wonder at the usefulness of such an application. I was a bit trepidatious when taking the first bite of this salad. I really had no idea whether it would work. I had never had kohlrabi, and never tasted apple with beetroot, and the dressing was a concoction purely from my mind. My mom said one of the …

Zingy Shrimp Salad

Should I extoll the virtues of shrimp, the versatility, how you can sauté, fry, broil, grill, or boil it? How it’s just as good breaded, deep fried, and dipped in cocktail sauce (which, let’s admit, is just dressed up ketchup) as it is marinated and grilled to perfection? Should I recount memories of peeling fresh shrimp, bought from a stand in downtown Tromsø, Norway, hands itching from the salt water and juices seeping into my weather-cracked fingers? Should I confess that every time I see popcorn shrimp on a menu, I’m tempted—even if the restaurant shouldn’t be serving seafood? Or perhaps this time it’s just simple: I was in the mood for a salad, and I wanted it to be zingy and zany and delicious. So I made one. The following ingredients are enough for two servings. Ingredients Directions Combine oil, red pepper flakes, and mint, then add shrimp (thawed if using frozen) and toss to coat. Slide shrimp on skewers and broil for 5-8 minutes, until pink and opaque, flipping halfway through. Remove and …

Turmeric Fennel Walnut Stuffed Cod & Orange Anise Kale

The silence is palpable, interrupted only by a quiet buzzing of insects and the occasional cry of a far off bird. The scent of mown grass and manure waft across the fields, and the gentle breeze causes silent ripples to move towards us and the shore. My peaceful calm shatters as Dad dangles a wriggling worm in front of me; it’s time to bait the hook. I can’t do it. Nope. Impaling even a minuscule and slimy creature isn’t in my repertoire. Not to mention that I’m seven and simply think it’s gross, even if I could do it. Thankfully, Dad gallantly baits my hook, and I’m able to enjoy the fun part of fishing. We fished for catfish at the family farm in Tennessee. Now that Scandinavia is home, cod is the fish of the day. Turmeric root has powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-bacterial properties, among other attributes, and has been used for centuries to treat a number of ailments. I used the powder form for a long time (which is the main ingredient in …

An Unconventional Norwegian Christmas Dinner for Two

A traditional Norwegian Christmas dinner consists of surkål (sourkraut), kålrabistappe (rutabaga purée), and Ribbe (a side of pork, from the rib meat to the skin). The meat is slow roasted and the rind gradually cooks and crisps into a nice crunchy crackling. Living in Sweden, I couldn’t find this cut anywhere, so I went for a leg, hoping to get the same effect with the crackling. Since I was already going a different route, I decided to mix up the sides as well, and made Hasselback Rutabagas and rødkål (spiced red cabbage) instead of surkål. Pork Leg with Crackling Ingredients -1.5-2kg (3.3-4.4lbs) pork leg, including bone and skin -1 tablespoon whole cloves -salt and pepper Directions Score the rind, through the skin and into the fat, with a sharp knife into 1.5 cm (.6 inch) diamonds. Rub completely with salt and pepper, working it into the grooves. Put one clove into each intersection of grooves. Bake right away, or leave overnight in the fridge, tightly covered. Preheat the oven to 230C/450F. In your baking dish, …

Cumin Roasted Avocados and Mango with Massaged Kale

So, I finally got around to making Yummy Supper’s Massaged Kale with Pomegranate, Persimmon, and Pistachio. And boy am I glad I did! It was so delicious and inspiring, I decided to go ahead and try a version that’s been swirling around in my head ever since I first read Erin’s post. So I had two lunches, and didn’t regret it at all! I had never eaten raw kale before trying this, and now I don’t know if I’ll ever cook it again. You can almost feel the energy flowing into your body when you eat this massaged kale. Since I’m usually a bit partial to lime, I decided to pair it with honey for my dressing, deviating from the original maple lemon. Then, I wanted a warmer, earthier feeling, so I took a note from Jamie Oliver’s Mad Dog Salad from his book, Jamie’s America, and roasted some avocados with cumin seeds. Topped with some pine nuts and, for a brighter element, both in color and taste, some mango, it ended up being a …

Squashed Quinoa Corn Fritters

When I get a new cookbook, usually I go through and bookmark every recipe I want to try first. Sometimes I color code: red for “cook immediately!”; pink for ones I’ll like but Tor won’t; blue for everything else; etc., etc. When I started through Plenty More by Yotam Ottolenghi, I had to force myself to stop using red, so the Fritter Roulette, towards the end of the book, got a blue label, instead of red, and thus was overlooked until I leafed through the whole thing again. The spices and butternut squash inspired me, so I played around with the spice ratios, used fresh instead of powdered turmeric, omitted the red chilli and padrón peppers, and added some quinoa to make it a bit more filling. I was quite delighted with the result. This recipe makes about six fritters, which is plenty for two lunches. Serve alongside a simple salad of arugula, tomatoes, and your vinaigrette of choice. Ingredients 1 egg 60 ml (1/4 cup) coconut milk 1 tablespoon (15 ml) cornflour 2 heaping …